Viewing Information in Customer Insights 2.0

Customer Insights is a great tool for people interested in creating custom reports, and this documentation includes information on creating your own Looks and on creating your own Dashboards. But, first and foremost, Customer Insights is a great tool for viewing and analyzing information, a business intelligence system that makes it easy to retrieve and make sense of data ranging from user logins and registrations to user demographics. Viewing information is really Customer Insights’ strongest suit.

So, do we really need documentation on how to view information? Well, maybe, maybe not. Obviously you can learn a lot from a Look or Dashboard simply by, well, looking at them. At the same time, however, there are also a few tips and tricks that can make for viewing time faster, more efficient, and more profitable. In this section of the documentation, we’ll go over a few of those tips and tricks, as well as explain some key Customer Insights concepts. For example, we’ll tell you all about:

  • Look and Dashboard Status Bars/Toolbars
  • Look Options
  • Dashboard Options
  • Working with Filters
  • Working with Visualizations
  • Working with Data

Look and Dashboard Status Bars/Toolbars

First things first. When you access a Look or a Dashboard you’ll see a status bar/toolbar (similar to the one shown below) in the upper right-hand corner of the Customer Insights window:

Status Bar and Toolbar

Each of these items is detailed in the following table:

Item Description
303 rows (Looks-only) Number of rows returned by the query (which is not necessarily all the records in the database).
0.2s (Looks-only) Amount of time it took the query to execute. If you see the message from cache, that means that data was retrieved from the cache and not from the data warehouse.
just now Indicates the last time data was retrieved from the database rather than the cache. The label Just now means that the most recent query retrieved data from the database. A label like 29m ago means that the data was last retrieved from the data warehouse 29 minutes. Any queries since that time (including the one just run) retrieved data from the cache.
America - Los Angeles Time zone the query was created under. Time zones can have an effect on date-based data: for example, an event that occurred at 8:30 PM in Portland, OR on March 1, 2018 occurred at 5:30 AM on March 2nd in Paris.

Run

The Run button executes the query for the Look (or the queries for each tile on the Dashboard). Depending on how a Look or Dashboard has been configured, you might need to click Run each time you open that item. For example, suppose you open a Look and see a message similar to this:

An Autorun-Disabled Look

The Press “Run” to load this data message (and the fact that no data appears onscreen) means that autorun has been disabled for this particular Look. In order to view the data and the visualization associated with the Look, click Run:

The Run Button

If you access a Look or Dashboard and the data and visualizations are already present that means that autorun is enabled and you don’t have to click Run when you open the item. Instead, you only have to click Run if you make a change and need to re-run your query. For example, suppose you add a new filter to a Look. In that case, the Run button turns purple, indicating that you must click the button and reload the data:

The Run Button When a Data Refresh is Required

Edit

Clicking Edit puts the Look or Dashboard into edit mode. For a Look, a modal Explore interface appears, giving you the opportunity to make changes to the Look’s filters, visualizations, and/or dataset:

The Explore Interface

Note. “Modal” means that the Explore takes over the window: you can’t do anything else with Customer Insights until you dismiss the Explore.

Make your changes to the Look and then click Save. If you decide not to make changes, or don’t want to save your changes, click Cancel instead. Note that there is no **Save As ** option: you can’t save the Look under a different name. If you want to make a copy of the Look, don’t go into edit mode; instead, click the Settings icon and then click Save as a Look in the Save Look dialog box:

The Save Look Dialog Box

If you click Save & View Look, a copy of the Look will be saved under a new name and you are automatically be taken to the new Look. From there you can edit the new Look and make any changes you want, all without affecting the original Look.

The Edit button also puts a Dashboard into edit mode, although edit mode for Dashboards differs from the edit mode for Looks. For more information, see Creating a Dashboard.

Look Options

In addition to the Run and Edit buttons, each Look also includes a number of different options for interacting with or saving the Look data. These options include:

  • Reset Look
  • Explore Here
  • The Details Section
  • The Look Options Icon

Each of these topics is addressed in the following sections of this documentation.

Reset Look

Undoes any changes you might have made to the Look and returns the Look to its original state. For example, suppose you add a new filter and then, for good measure, change the row limit in the Data Section. Clicking Reset Look removes the filter modification and restores the original row limit.

Note that this affects only the data set and the data display of the Look. If you apply a schedule to the Look or if you enable/disable autorun, those changes cannot be undone by clicking Reset Look.

Explore from Here

Opens up an Explore that uses the exact same settings as the Look. Note that this Explore replicates the Look but is not tied to the Look in any way: if you make changes to the Explore those changes will not affect the Look.

The Details Section

The Details section provides additional information about a Look, including telling you whether anyone has scheduled the Look and whether the Look appears on any Dashboards. The Details section is shown by default any time you open a Look. If you’d rather hide this section, providing more room for your data and your visualization, just click the expand/collapse arrow:

The Details Section

Click the arrow a second time to make the section reappear:

Restoring the Details Section

Description

A brief description of the Look. If you have edit permissions, you can click the Edit link and modify this description:

Adding a Look Description

Type the new description in the Description field and then click Save.

Scheduled

The Scheduled section has two primary functions: 1) it lets you know whether you (or anyone else) has applied a schedule to the Look; and, 2) it lets you create or delete schedules (albeit only your own schedules) for that Look.

Note. But just for that Look: schedules must be created one Look at a time.

In the Scheduled section, you’ll send a status message similar to this:

The Scheduled Section

The message No means that no one in your organization has applied a schedule to this Look. The message Yes, only by you means that you’ve added a scheduled to the Look, but no one else has. And the message Yes, by you and one other person (or two other persons or nine other persons or whatever) means that you and someone else have scheduled the Look. (There could be other status messages applied, but you get the idea.) Knowing whether or not other people have scheduled the Look can be useful if you’re thinking about deleting or moving the Look.

That’s a good question: can you tell which people have scheduled the Look besides you? No, you can’t. (Only administrators have access to other people’s schedule.) Unless you’re an administrator, you only have knowledge of your schedules. For example, if you go to the Shared Space and see a little calendar icon, that means that you have applied a schedule to the Look:

A Scheduled Look in the Shared Space

Has anyone else applied a schedule to the Look? Has anyone else applied a schedule to any Look? That information is not available to you.

As far as creating schedules, click the Edit Your Schedules link to display the scheduling dialog box:

Editing a Schedule

To create a schedule, fill out the form (or accept the default values) and then click Save All:

The Scheduling Dialog Box

But be careful here: that’s the procedure for creating your first schedule. If you want to add a second schedule, don’t bring up the dialog box, make a few changes, and then click Save All; doing that modifies your existing schedule (leaving you still with just one schedule). To add a second schedule, bring up the dialog box and click Create New Schedule. When you do that, you’ll have two schedules applied to the Look:

Viewing Your Schedules List

Note. Why would you even want to apply multiple schedules to a Look? Well, for one thing, you might want delivery at different times; for example, maybe you want delivery at 8:00 AM on Mondays but at 4:00 PM on Wednesdays. The dialog box doesn’t allow for that kind of scheduling.

For another, your Look might have filters that enable you to return different datasets; for example, you might be able to return data for US residents and then, by adjusting the filter, return data for non-US residents. In a case like that, you could schedule delivery using the US residents filter, then schedule a second delivery, this one using the non-US filter.

In the scheduling dialog box, the schedule you’re currently working with is shaded in gray (you can also identify the specific schedule by looking at the Title field). If you decide you don’t need two schedules after all, just click the Delete button (X) next to the schedule you want to remove:

Removing a Schedule

At that point, click Save All, and you’ll be back to a single schedule. If you delete all the schedules and then click Save All, you’ll no longer have any schedules applied to the Look.

On Dashboards

If *On Dashboards reads No, that means that the Look does not appear on any Dashboards:

The On Dashboards Section

If the Look does appear on one or more Dashboards, the On Dashboards section displays links to those Dashboards:

A Look that is on a Dashboard

If you have the required permissions, you can click Add to Dashboard to bring up the Add to a Dashboard in this Space dialog box:

The Add to a Dashboard Dialog Box

From here you have two primary options, as implied by the buttons **Add Look to Dashboard **and Save to Dashboard. Despite the similarity in button names, the two options are different:

  • You can add the Look to a Dashboard. When you add a Look to a Dashboard, you create a link between the Dashboard and the Look. For example, if you modify the Look, the “Look-linked” tile in the Dashboard updates as well. If you delete the Look, or move it to a different space, the Dashboard displays an error (because the original Look is no longer available).

    The Add Look to Dashboard option is best-suited for Looks you expect to use on multiple Dashboards; that way, if you need to make changes to the Look, you can do so by modifying the Look itself, without having to make those same modifications on each Dashboard.

    This option is only available for Dashboards in the same space as the Look.

  • You can save the Look to a Dashboard. When you save a Look, you essentially install a stand-alone copy of that Look in the Dashboard. This copy is not tied to the original Look in any way: if you delete the original Look, the copy (referred to in Dashboard as a “query tile”) will continue to work as expected.

The Look Options Icon

If you click the Look Options icon (the little icon that looks like a gear), you’ll see the following menu (or, depending on your permissions, a menu featuring a subset of these menu options):

The Look Options Menu

Each of these menu options is explained below.

Save as a Look

Enables you to save a copy of the Look under a different name. Note that you can only save the Look to spaces where you have the Manage Access, Edit permission. If you try to save the Look to a space where you don’t have this permission, you’ll receive a warning to that effect, and the Save & View Look button will be unavailable:

Permission Denied to Save a Look

The title you give your look must be unique within the Space where it is being saved; however, that title does not have to be unique across Customer Insights; you could have a Look called Demographics in every Space in your organization. (However, giving Looks unique names might be something of a best practice.) Title, by the way are case-insensitive: Demographics is the same title as demographics and the same title as DEMOGRAPHICS.

Save to Dashboard

Enables you to save the Look to a Dashboard. When you do this, the Look is saved as a tile and not as a look; that’s important to keep in mind, because tiles are bound to a Dashboard. By contrast, Looks can be added to multiple Dashboards, and can be viewed even if they are not part of a Dashboard.

Needless to say, you can only save Looks to Dashboards where you have the Manage Access, Edit permission. If you try to save the Look to a Dashboard where you don’t have this permission the Save to Dashboard button will be unavailable:

Permission Denied to Save to a Dashboard

Note that tile titles do not have to be unique, even on the same Dashboard; if you wanted, every single tile on your Dashboard could have the exact same title:

A Dashboard Where All the Tiles Have the Same Title

Download

Enables you to download a copy of the Look data to your computer. See Downloading Data for more information.

Send

Enables you to send a copy of the Look data to someone else, even if that person does not have access to Customer Insights. See Sending Data for more information.

Schedule

Enables you to schedule automated retrieval and delivery of Look data. See Scheduling Data Delivery for more information.

Share

Provides the URL to the Look; this URL enables users to log on to Customer Insights and access the Look directly, without having to find it:

The Share Dialog Box

Note that this URL does you no good unless you have a valid Customer Insights account and have access to the Space where the Look is stored.

Edit Settings

The Edit Settings option displays the Look Settings dialog, which (despite the repeated use of the word settings) contains only a single option:

The Look Settings Dialog Box

When set to On, Run on Load means that the Look automatically runs each time it is accessed. If this option is set to Off, then the Look doesn’t run each time it is accessed. Instead, you see a message similar to this:

A Look Where Autorun Has Been Disabled

In turn, you must click Run in order to retrieve data and display the visualization.

Note that this only applies to the Look itself. If you add the Look to a Dashboard (and if the Dashboard is set to autorun) this setting will be ignored and the query will run each time the Dashboard is opened.

Clear Cache & Refresh

When you first access a Look, Customer Insights retrieves the requested data from the data warehouse. That data is then displayed in your visualization, and a copy of the data is stored in the cache, where it remains for one hour before being discarded. If you (or anyone else) accesses the Look during that hour, data will be retrieved from the cache rather than the data warehouse. That means that the data displayed on the Look might not be the absolutely latest set of data stored in the data warehouse.

If you are concerned about that, click Clear Cache & Refresh: that causes Customer Insights to clear the cache and retrieve the latest set of data from the data warehouse.

Delete

Enables you to delete the Look. Before the Look is actually removed, you will be asked to confirm the deletion:

Removing a Look

Deleted Looks (and Dashboards) are initially sent to a Trash folder. From there, an administrator can choose to:

  • Restore the deleted items.
  • Permanently remove the deleted items from Customer Insights.
  • Do nothing at all (deleted items can remain the Trash indefinitely.

Dashboard Options

Similar to Looks, each Dashboard also has a Settings icon. However, Dashboards have a different set of options than Looks:

The Dashboard Options Menu

Dashboard options are described in the following sections of this documentation.

Clear Cache & Refresh

When you first access a Dashboard, Customer Insights retrieves the requested data from the data warehouse. That data is then displayed in your visualization, and a copy of the data is stored in the cache, where it remains for one hour before being discarded. If you (or anyone else) access the Dashboard during that hour, data is retrieved from the cache rather than the data warehouse. That means that the data displayed on the Dashboard might not be the absolutely latest set of data stored in the data warehouse.

If you are concerned about that, click Clear Cache & Refresh: that causes Customer Insights to clear the cache and retrieve the latest set of data from the data warehouse.

Download as PDF

Enables you to download the Dashboard as a .PDF file:

The Download Dialog Box

As you can see, you have a couple of options for downloading the Dashboard. By default, the downloaded .PDF files mimics the look of the Dashboard:

A Downloaded Dashboard File

Alternatively, you can select Single Column PDF and download a .PDF file formatted with visualizations stacked on top of each other:

A Single Column PDF File

Or, instead of downloading the file, you can click Open in Browser, and view the .PDF file in your web browser instead.

Download as CSVs

Enables you to download a .ZIP file containing a set of comma-separated values (CSV) file, one for each tile on the Dashboard. For example, suppose you have a visualization that looks like this:

Sample Dashboard File

The CSV file for the preceding visualization looks like this:

Event Fact Event Type,Event Fact Count
signin.traditonal,"23,978,100"
signin.traditonal_register,"6,245,048"
signin.sso,"3,393,543"
entity_update,"2,997,647"
signin.social,"761,526"
signin.social_register,"502,395"
entity_create,"272,656"
entity_delete,"1,488"

Send

Enables you to send a copy of the Dashboard data to someone else, even if that person does not have access to Customer Insights. See Sending Data for more information.

Schedule

Enables you to schedule automated retrieval and delivery of Dashboard data. See Scheduling Data Delivery for more information.

View Access Settings

Enables you to view the users and groups who have access to the Dashboard:

Viewing Dashboard Access Settings

In Customer Insights, you do not set access permissions on individual Dashboards or Looks. Instead, permissions are set on Spaces, and those permissions are then inherited by all the items that reside in those Spaces.

Delete

Enables you to delete the Dashboard. Before the Dashboard is removed, you will be asked to confirm the deletion:

The Delete Dashboard Dialog Box

Note that deleting a Dashboard also deletes all the Looks on that Dashboard, except for Looks that:

  • Are used on another Dashboard.
  • Someone has scheduled.
  • Someone has marked as a favorite.

Deleted Dashboards (and Looks, for that matter) are initially sent to a Trash folder. From there, an administrator can choose to:

  • Restore the deleted items.
  • Permanently remove the deleted items from Customer Insights
  • Do nothing at all (deleted items can remain the Trash indefinitely).

Filters

When you design a Look or a Dashboard, you have the option of including filters; filters provide a way for you to “slice and dice” the data to your heart’s content. For example, the Report - Events Summary Dashboard lets you filter on seven different fields:

  • App ID
  • App Name
  • Event Type
  • API Client Name
  • Entity Type
  • Provider (IDP)
  • Date Range

If you want to take a different peek at the data (for example, if you want to see data for the last 30 days rather than the last 90 days), click Filters to expand the Filters section of the Dashboard:

The Dashboard Filters Section

Note. What if you don’t see an expand/collapse Filters link? That means that the Dashboard/Look designer didn’t include any filters.

Each filter on the Look or Dashboard will include three sections: the field name (e.g., App ID), the operator type (for example, is equal to) and the target filter value. Unless you are in edit mode, you cannot delete any of the fields, nor can you add new fields. What you can do, however, is:

  • Change the operator
  • Change the target value
  • Add an AND or OR clause

Let’s walk through an example or two to show you exactly how filters work. To begin with, let’s take a look at the Profiles By Creation Month (Last 12 Months) visualization:

Profiles by Creation Month Dashboard

As you can see, this visualization graphs the total number profiles of created each month for the past year. But suppose we’re only interested in those months when profile creations reached 300,000 or more. If that’s the case, then we can add this filter:

Filtering by Profile Numbers

We’ve done two things with our new filter. First, we clicked the operator field and changed the operator to is greater than or equal to. Why? You got it: the previous operator (is equal to) would have shown us only those days where the event count was exactly 300,000. Now, we’ll see all the days where the event count was equal to 300,000 or more.

Second, we entered our target filter value: 3000000. And yes, because this is a numeric field, we can’t include commas; entering a value of 300,000 would result in an error:

An Incorrect Filter Value

A quick aside: You don’t have to type in a search value when configuring a filter. For example, if you click in an Event Type box and wait a second or two, a dropdown list will appear showing all the event types currently in the database:

Selecting a Filter Target Value

Instead of typing signin.traditonal_register, you can simply select the value from the list.

Of course, sometimes there are too many possibilities to fit in a dropdown list; for example, you might have literally thousands of cities in your database. In a case like, as soon as the drop down appears, start typing the city name (e.g., Albuquerque). Customer Insights will begin filtering the filter and, the desired name will eventually show up:

Selecting a Filter Target Value

But back to our example. If we click Run to execute the query, we should see a marked difference in our visualization:

The Filtered Visualization

As noted, you can’t add additional fields to filter on; that’s up to the person who created the Look or Dashboard. However, you can filter on the same field in multiple ways. For example, suppose we’re interested in outliers: months when the event count reached or exceeded 325,000 or months when the event count failed to reach at least 250,000. This filter will do that for us:

Adding a Filter Clause

In turn, we get a visualization and that shows the highs and the lows, and nothing in between:

The Filtered Visualization

To add a clause to a filter, click the + sign next to the filter of interest; that adds a second clause that filters on the same field:

Adding a Filter Clause

Note that Customer Insights analyzes the field and its datatype, and automatically chooses the Boolean operator (AND or OR) to apply the clause. In this case, OR makes the most sense, so the new clause is added as an OR clause. (Why does it make the most sense? Because a single month can’t have a profile count that is simultaneously greater than 325,000 and less than 250,000.) After clicking +, we selected the appropriate operator (is less than), added the search value (2500000), and then clicked Run.

If we want to add another clause, we can do that by clicking + again. Alternatively, we can delete either of our clauses by clicking the X next to the clause:

Adding a Target Filter Value

Note. However, you can’t get rid of both clauses: as soon as you’re down to a single clause, the X disappears from the lone remaining clause.

And you’re right: sometimes Customer Insights might insert an AND clause when you really wanted to do an OR search: you wanted to find all the users who live in Oregon or in Washington. Interestingly enough, you can do that sort of search without having to insert an additional clause of any type. Instead:

  1. Click in the Region field and select OR from the dropdown list. Oregon will appear in a little gray box:

    Filtering on Multiple Values with One Clause
  2. Click in the Region field again (in a blank spot to the right of OR) and select WA. Both OR and WA will appear in the Region field:

     Filtering on Multiple Values with One Clause

If you run your query now, users who live in either Oregon or Washington will be returned:

The Filtered Dataset

And you’re not limited to just two selections: if you want to, just keep clicking and just keep adding states:

A Filter with Five Target Values

To remove a state from the list, just click the little X next to the state name.

If you want to reset the Dashboard to its original settings, but can’t remember what those original settings actually were, just leave the page and then come back.

Note. If you’re working with a Look rather than a Dashboard, you don’t have to leave the page. Instead, just click Reset Look:

Resetting a Look

Working with Visualizations

Filters aren’t the only way to interact with a Look or a Dashboard. In addition to setting filters, you can also:

  • Hover the mouse over individual data points to see actual totals
  • Show/hide items in a visualization
  • Re-sort the data in the data table
  • Zoom in and out on a map

Hover the mouse over individual data points to see actual totals

Many visualizations are designed to show you trends and relationships; for example, one quick glance at the Events By Top 15 Device Brands visualization will tell you that most people are accessing your site by using Apple devices:

Sample Visualization

That’s excellent information. But suppose you wanted to know the actual number of events associated with Apple devices. That’s hard to tell, especially since the Apple value extends beyond the tick mark (10,000,000). But that’s OK; to see the actual value for a data point, just hover the mouse anywhere over that data point:

Data Point Tooltip

Show/hide items in a visualization

Some visualizations enable you to modify (within limitations) the fields displayed in that visualization. For example, take a Look at the Events By Day of Week visualization:

Sample Stacked Column Visualization

If you look very closely (and for Tuesday only), you’ll see a light brown representing signin.social_register. Obviously, this event type doesn’t occur very often; it barely registers at all. Of course, many of the other event types don’t stand out, either; that’s because the vast majority of events are signin.tradtional events. Taking a few terminology liberties here, we have a poor signal-to-noise ratio: the sheer abundance of signin.traditional events makes it difficult to get a good picture of the other event types.

So what can we do about that? Well, one thing we can do is temporarily hide the signin.traditional events. If we click signin.traditional in the legend, our visualization will redraw itself to look like this (note how signin.traditional is grayed-out):

Removing a Chart Series

To restore the visualization to its original format, just click signin.traditional again.

Re-sort the data in the data table

If you have data presented in a table, you can sort that data by clicking the appropriate column header. For example, by default the Events By Browser (Table) visualization sorts data by Count. Would you rather have the data sorted alphabetically by **Browser **name? That’s fine; just click the Browser column heading:

Sorting Data in a Table

That sorts the data in descending order (Z to A; note the downward-pointing arrow). To sort data in ascending order (A to Z), click the column header a second time:

Sorting in Ascending Order

Once again, note the direction of the arrow.

Zoom in and out on a map

If you’re working with a map visualization, you might have the ability to zoom in and out on the map. (As usual, that depends on whether the Dashboard/Look developer enabled that option.) For example, suppose you have a visualization similar to this:

Sample Map Visualization

Let’s further suppose your primary interest is in central Europe. In that case, just click the zoom-in tool (the +) a few times:

Zooming in on a Map

And what if you zoom in and now things are a bit off-kilter? Again, no problem: just hold the mouse over the map and see if a little hand icon appears. If it does, that means you can click the mouse, hold down the left mouse button, and drag the map around until you have the view you want.

And if that’s not enough, clicking a spot at the map will reveal the data for the location:

A Map Tooltip

Working with Data

The Data Section of a Look is “just” the record set returned by the query and “just” the raw data used to construct a visualization. But don’t sell the Data Section short. Not only is there a wealth of data in this section, but there are some interesting things you can do with that data.

Sorting Data in a Table

When you create a table visualization, you can define the field (or fields) that data sorts on; if you don’t explicitly define a sort order then, by default, Customer Insights will sort your table on the first column in the table, in ascending order (A to Z). This sort order determines the initial appearance of the table. However, when viewing a table you can re-sort the data pretty much any way you want.

To explain how to do this, let’s start by looking at a table that shows postal codes, country names, and city names. By default, this table is sorted by postal code (note the upward-pointing arrow in the Postal Code column):

Three Column Dataset Sorted by Postal Code

Whether or not this is the best way to sort this data by postal code is irrelevant; after all, we can change the sort order any time we want. For example, to sort by Country, just click the Country column:

Sorting the Data by Country

As you can see, any time you sort on a new column that data is sorted in descending (Z to A) order; that explains the downward-pointing arrow in the Country column). If you’d rather see the data sorted in ascending order, just click the Country column a second time.

Now here’s something really cool. Sorting data by country is nice, but what would be even nicer is sorting data by country and then by city. Can you do that, can you sort by multiple columns in the same table? You bet you can. To sort by country and then sort by city within each country, do this:

  1. Click the Country column to sort by country. If you want to sort in ascending order, click Country a second time.
  2. Hold down the Shift key and then click City. To sort by city in ascending order, hold down the Shift key and click City a second time.

The net results will be something that looks like this:

Sorting Data by Two Columns

And yes, you can sort by country, by city, and then by postal code:

Sorting Data by Three Columns

Like we said, pretty cool.

The only thing to keep in mind is that you need to hold down the Shift key for this to work. If you click a column header without holding down the Shift key you’ll sort solely on that column, and any other sorting options you might have set will disappear.

If you fool around with the sort order and then decide you want to go back to the original sort order, there’s a quick way to do that. If you’re viewing a Look, click Reset Look:

Resetting the Sort Order

That puts the Look back to the way you found it. Just note that it will also remove any filters you’ve applied to the table.

And what if you’re viewing the table in a Dashboard? In that case, click the Options menu for the table and then click Clear Cache & Refresh:

Resetting Dashboard Sort Orders

That will reload the Dashboard data and, along the way, reload the Dashboard itself.

Setting Row and Column Limits

Looks always come with a limit on how many rows the query will return (by default, Looks return 500 rows, although the Look developer can make that limit higher or lower). There might be times, however, when you want to see more rows (or fewer rows) than are displayed by default. When times like that arise, you can change the number of rows returned by going to the Data section and modifying the Row Limit field:

Assigning a Row Limit

For example, here’s a standard visualization:

Sample Dataset

And here’s the same visualization with the row limit set to 5:

A Row-Limited Dataset

If the visualization you’re working with uses a pivot, you can place a similar limit on the number of columns displayed in the table.

See Also

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